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2018 Statistics!

What a great year 2018 was! We cannot believe the year is over and we are now well into 2019.

We have always been huge fans of transparency, so we like to publish our statistics in an easy-to-understand way. Numbers can always be taken and twisted one way or another based on the bias of the person doing the statistics, which is why we are very clear with what we include in each number and percentage.

Some definitions to help understand our numbers:

  • AP transfers: These are women who transferred out of our care prenatally. This may have been due to a health complication or it may have been a choice a woman made for a different birth location or even a woman who moved during pregnancy. In a few cases, we never found out where the women transferred to or why they discontinued care with us.
  • Pre-admission transfers of care: These are women who were in our care at the time their labor started. They were not admitted to the birth center. Reasons for pre-admission transfers include things like: preterm labor, maternal choice for pain relief once contractions started, a precipitous labor (fast labor) in a woman who felt she didn’t have time to get to us, known non-vertex lie (breech baby), and/or a health issue reported to us on the phone that indicated a woman should go to the closest hospital rather than coming in to see us when labor began.
  • Post admission IP transfer of care: These are women who were admitted to the birth center (or home for planned homebirths) and were transferred to the hospital in the intrapartum time (in labor).
  • PP transfer of care: This is women who were admitted, birthed with us, and then were transferred to the hospital in the postpartum time.

THE STATS!!

Prenatal information

  • 116- This is the number of women who were in our care in 2018 with 2018 due dates or 2019 due dates who birthed in 2018.
  • 0- This is the number of women with 2018 due dates who had babies in 2019 instead.
  • 26- AP transfers of care, miscarriages, or women who moved. The majority of our AP transfers of care were not related to health conditions.

Women in our care at the start of labor

  • 85 women were in our care at the start of their labor
  • 5.88% (5)- pre-admission transfers of care. These were early bird babies or situations that did not meet the risk criteria to be admitted to the birth center in labor.
  • 2.35%- Preterm birth rate for women in our care. 2 women called with labor prior to 37 weeks and were sent to their closest hospital to give birth (they are also included in the pre-admission transfer numbers above). This is lower than the state average and lower than the national average. There are many factors at play with this number. We are caring for low-risk women, so those with heightened risk factors were transferred prenatally. We also do not care for pregnancies with twins, which have a higher rate of preterm birth than singleton pregnancies. However, we don’t wish to dismiss the power of midwifery care in helping to prevent preterm births because we serve a very high percentage of women who are on Medicaid, are uninsured, or are under insured, which are typically risk factors for preterm birth.

Women admitted to the birth center in labor

The following percentages will be based on the number of women who were admitted into our care in labor, so it will exclude the AP transfers of care and pre-admission transfers of care. This makes for the most accurate math of how often, once someone was admitted with an anticipated normal course of labor, birth, and postpartum, we had to pack up and head to a hospital for the birth.

  • 80- The number of women who were admitted into our care in labor
  • 4 (5%)- After being admitted to the birth center in labor, we had to transfer to the hospital 4 times during labor. The most common reasons for us to transfer to the hospital after admission are for prolonged rupture of membranes or prolonged labor with a malpositioned baby.
  • 95% (76)- The number of women who were admitted in labor and birthed at the birth center or at home with us, as planned.
  • 3.75% (3)- c-section rate for women who were admitted into our care in labor. If we include all women who were in our care at the start of labor (so including pre-admission transfers), there were 5 c-sections for a rate of 5.89%. Total cummulative c-section rate for River Valley Birth Center from 2014 until December 31, 2018 is 4.9% (14 out of 285 births).

Postpartum transfers/Newborn transfers

Out of the 76 women who birthed with us in the birth center or at home, as planned, we had to go to the hospital 3 times (or 3.95%) in the postpartum time period. These reasons can be varied and for things such as: retained placenta, continued treatment after a postpartum hemorrhage, or for repair of 3rd or 4th degree laceration.

2 of the 76 babies who were born in our care were transferred to the hospital after birth.

Demographics of clients in 2018 at River Valley Birth Center

I love figuring out the demographics of our clients. It is fun to see how it changes year-to-year. Some demographics we won’t share as they may make some clients feel singled out if the percentage is extremely low in one area or another.

Of the 85 women in our care at the start of labor:

  • 82.5% were on Medicaid  or were uninsured or underinsured.
  • 22.35% were expecting their first baby… which is much lower than typical years! However, this is because we were lucky that so many of our clients this year were working with us for the 2nd, 3rd, 4th…. Maybe even 5th time 🙂
  • 1.18% of the babies were considered low birth weight (they were preterm as well)
  • 50.59% were baby boys (43 boys)
  • 49.41% were baby girls (42 girls)

The absolute least popular day of the week to be born was Wednesday for a second year in a row. The most popular day of the week to be born in 2018 at RVBC was Monday, but most of our Monday births were results of Sunday labors! Babies here LOVE coming on weekends…. Fridays, Saturdays, Sundays, and into Mondays.

Our busiest “Baby Storm” of 2018 was a grouping of 5 births that all took place within a 34 hour span of time.

We feel so fortunate to have worked with the beautiful families we have in 2018. Actually, we are so fortunate to have worked with the amazing families we have since we opened in July of 2014…. 285 times we have taken that phone call that tells us a new person is going to enter the world and it just never gets old!

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